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Lone Worker Contact Details 

Establishing a healthy and safe working environment for lone workers can be different from organising the health and safety of other employees. They should not be put at more risk than other people working for you.

It will often be safe to work alone. However, the law requires employers to think about and deal with any health and safety risks before people are allowed to do so.

Things you could consider to help ensure lone workers are not put at risk include:

  • assessing areas of risk including violence, manual handling, the medical suitability of the individual to work alone and whether the workplace itself presents a risk to them
  • requirements for training, levels of experience and how best to monitor and supervise them
  • making sure you know what is happening, including having systems in place to keep in touch with them


Monitoring

Procedures must be put in place to monitor lone workers as effective means of
communication are essential. These may include:

  • supervisors periodically visiting and observing people working alone;
  • pre-agreed intervals of regular contact between the lone worker and supervisor, using phones, radios or email, bearing in mind the worker’s understanding of English;
  • manually operated or automatic warning devices which trigger if specific signals are not received periodically from the lone worker, eg staff security systems;
  • implementing robust system to ensure a lone worker has returned to their base or home once their task is completed.


Download our free –
Lone Worker Staff Information Contact Sheet